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Employers Find “Soft” Skills, Like Reasoning, In Short Supply!

“Companies across the U.S. say it is becoming increasingly difficult to find applicants who can communicate clearly, take initiative, problem-solve and get along with co- workers.

“Those traits, often called soft skills, can make the difference between a standout employee and one who just gets by.” – claims a recent Wall Street Journal article, Employers Find ‘Soft Skills’ Like Critical Thinking in Short Supply – WSJ.

Students who come to The Great Connections Seminars develop those pronto. Their increase in these skills in one-week is astonishing. Great Connections 2016 student Saulo Maciel, junior in Communications from Campo Grande, Brazil said “I learned more here in one week than in ten years at school.”

 

Learn about the collectivist control of education

Bending children to the needs of the state go back much farther than Common Core. Hear about the failure of public education to teach most of its students — since its inception in Massachusetts in the early 19th century.

What kind of education fosters the habits and virtues needed for in a free society, where independent, active, versatile, and self-responsible citizens are crucial? What would the education market look like in a fully free society, with entirely private education? Hear my answers and the way in which everyone would be served by private interests.

My talk at The Heartland Institute, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. Read Common Ground on Common Core, edited by Kirsten Lombard, for the complete, referenced account.

Do We Need the Department of Education?

In the latest edition of Hillsdale College’s ImprimisCharles Murray recently wrote an excellent piece entitled “Do We Need the Department of Education?” adapted from a 2011 speech of his.

He notes that the Department of Education didn’t come into being until 1980, but large-scale involvement of the federal government in education dates from 1965. In this piece he delves into the historical justifications and evolution of how education came under federal guidance, and based on its track record whether it should remain so. In the age of Common Core, of public education disappointing parents and failing children, it is an enlightening piece that’s worth a read in its entirety. Here are some important highlights:

On whether the Department of Education is constitutional:

Constitution Article 1 Section 8

“At the time the Constitution was written, education was not even considered a function of local government, let alone the federal government. But the shakiness of the Department of Education’s constitutionality goes beyond that. Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution enumerates the things over which Congress has the power to legislate. Not only does the list not include education, there is no plausible rationale for squeezing education in under the commerce clause. I’m sure the Supreme Court found a rationale, but it cannot have been plausible.

On a more philosophical level, the framers of America’s limited government had a broad allegiance to what Catholics call the principle of subsidiarity. In the secular world, the principle of subsidiarity means that local government should do only those things that individuals cannot do for themselves, state government should do only those things that local governments cannot do, and the federal government should do only those things that the individual states cannot do. Education is something that individuals acting alone and cooperatively can do, let alone something local or state governments can do.

On whether there are serious problems in education that can be solved only at the federal level:

“The first major federal spending on education was triggered by the launch of the first space satellite, Sputnik, in the fall of 1957, which created a perception that the United States had fallen behind the Soviet Union in science and technology. The legislation was specifically designed to encourage more students to go into math and science, and its motivation is indicated by its title: The National Defense Education Act of 1958. But what really ensnared the federal government in education in the 1960s had its origins elsewhere—in civil rights. The Supreme Court declared segregation of the schools unconstitutional in 1954, but—notwithstanding a few highly publicized episodes such as the integration of Central High School in Little Rock and James Meredith’s admission to the University of Mississippi—the pace of change in the next decade was glacial.

Supreme Court Bans Segregation

Was it necessary for the federal government to act? There is a strong argument for “yes,” especially in the case of K-12 education. Southern resistance to desegregation proved to be both stubborn and effective in the years following Brown v. Board of Education. Segregation of the schools had been declared unconstitutional, and constitutional rights were being violated on a massive scale. But the question at hand is whether we need a Department of Education now, and we have seen a typical evolution of policy. What could have been justified as a one-time, forceful effort to end violations of constitutional rights, lasting until the constitutional wrongs had been righted, was transmuted into a permanent government establishment. Subsequently, this establishment became more and more deeply involved in American education for purposes that have nothing to do with constitutional rights, but instead with a broader goal of improving education.”

On the federal government’s track record in education:

“As I documented in my book, Real Education, collateral data from other sources are not as detailed, nor do they go back to the 1940s, but they tell a consistent story. American education had been improving since World War II. Then, when the federal government began to get involved, it got worse.

I will not try to make the case that federal involvement caused the downturn. The effort that went into programs associated with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 in the early years was not enough to have changed American education, and the more likely causes for the downturn are the spirit of the 1960s—do your own thing—and the rise of progressive education to dominance over American public education. But this much can certainly be said: The overall data on the performance of American K-12 students give no reason to think that federal involvement, which took the form of the Department of Education after 1979, has been an engine of improvement.

On the education of the disadvantaged, especially minorities:

“What about the education of the disadvantaged, especially minorities? After all, this was arguably the main reason that the federal government began to get involved in education—to reduce the achievement gap separating poor children and rich children, and especially the gap separating poor black children and the rest of the country.

The most famous part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was Title I, initially authorizing more than a billion dollars annually (equivalent to more than $7 billion today) to upgrade the schools attended by children from low-income families. The program has continued to grow ever since, disposing of about $19 billion in 2010 (No Child Left Behind has also been part of Title I).

NAEP Data on Achievement Gap

Supporters of Title I confidently expected to see progress, and so formal evaluation of Title I was built into the legislation from the beginning. Over the years, the evaluations became progressively more ambitious and more methodologically sophisticated. But while the evaluations have improved, the story they tell has not changed. Despite being conducted by people who wished the program well, no evaluation of Title I from the 1970s onward has found credible evidence of a significant positive impact on student achievement. If one steps back from the formal evaluations and looks at the NAEP test score gap between high-poverty schools (the ones that qualify for Title I support) and low-poverty schools, the implications are worse. A study by the Department of Education published in 2001 revealed that the gap grew rather than diminished from 1986—the earliest year such comparisons have been made—through 1999.

That brings us to No Child Left Behind. Have you noticed that no one talks about No Child Left Behind any more? The explanation is that its one-time advocates are no longer willing to defend it. The nearly-flat NAEP trendlines since 2002 make that much-ballyhooed legislative mandate—a mandate to bring all children to proficiency in math and reading by 2014—too embarrassing to mention.

In summary: the long, intrusive, expensive role of the federal government in K-12 education does not have any credible evidence for a positive effect on American education.

Read Charles Murray’s entire piece here.

Great Quote by Arthur Koestler on Education and the Sciences

An excellent quote on education and the sciences from Arthur Koestler’s fascinating book Arrow in the Blue:

“For people who regard mathematics as dry and the sciences as boring, this kind of mentality is difficult to understand. It is a peculiarity of our present civilisation that the average educated person will be ashamed to admit that a work of art is beyond his comprehension although, in the same breath, he will proclaim not without pride his complete ignorance of the laws which make his electric switch work, or govern the heredity of his offspring. He uses his radio set and the countless gadgets surrounding him with no more comprehension of what makes them function than a savage. He lives in an artificial world of cheap, mass-produced mysteries which he is too lazy to penetrate, without any understanding of the objects which he manipulates and is, in consequence, mentally isolated from his immediate environment. Our whole higher educational system is designed to foster this lopsided mentality, to create indifference towards the laws of nature, a deficiency comparable to myopia or colourblindness.

Arthur Koestler

Given these circumstances, and the ways in which science is taught in our schools, it is difficult to convey a child’s delight and excitement in penetrating the mysteries of the Pythagorean triangle, or of Kepler’s laws of planetary movement, or of Planck’s theory of quanta. It is the excitement of the explorer who, even though his goal is limited and specialised, is always driven by an unconscious, childlike hope of stumbling upon the ultimate mystery. The Phoenician galleys journeyed over uncharted seas to find the Pillars of Hercules, and even Captain Scott may have been unknowingly tempted by the hope that perhaps there really was a hole at the South Pole in which the earth’s axis turned on bearings of ice. From the star-gazers of Babylon down to the great artist-scientists of the Renaissance, the urge to explore was one of man’s vital drives, and even in Goethe’s day it would have been as shocking for an educated person to say that he took no interest in science as to declare that he was bored with art. The increasing volume of facts and the specialisation of research have made this interest gradually dry up and become a monopoly of technicians and specialists. From the middle of the nineteenth century onward, physics, chemistry, biology, and astrophysics began to fade out as ingredients of a rounded education. However, in pre-Relativistic days it was still just possible for the non-specialist to keep abreast of general developments in science. I grew up during the closing years of that era, before science became so formalised  and abstract that it was removed from the layman’s grasp. Atoms still moved in three-dimensional space and should be represented to the senses by models—little glass spheres revolving around a nucleus like planets around the sun. Space was still non-curved, the world infinite, the mind a rational clockwork. There was no fourth dimension, and there was no subconscious id—that fourth dimension of the mind which transforms straight lines into crooked lines, and the deductions of reason into a web of self-delusions.”

Tutor Lauds Student Transformation from Great Connections Seminar

Last fall we received an email message in response to our Report on The Great Connections 2015 Summer Seminar about Derick Ansah, a spectacular student we had the pleasure of having with us last summer.

Derick Ansah, Great Connections Student

When Derick went back to school that fall, RIFI Founder and President Marsha Familaro Enright received an email from Nawaphon Sittisawassakul at the SUNY/Purchase Economics Department. The kind of growth described in his email about Derick is exactly what we aim to provide for all students at The Great Connections Seminar. It’s a touching message that we wanted to share with you. Transformations like Derick’s make The Great Connections Seminar such a valuable and meaningful experience for young people today.

Hi Marsha!

The update you sent me looked awesome. It’s very cool to see Derick Ansah go through all that along with your other students from around the world. To tell you the truth, when I met him again at the beginning of this fall semester, it was like meeting a completely new person.

Derick had changed mentally and spiritually so much in the short months of the summer break and I think it had to do hugely because of your program. He’s now more critical and analytical of works and ideologies while in the Econ classes lectures, talks, and seminars. His question-asking manner in class has also increased in acuity and form. It’s as if he grew 2 years worth of college prowess in your short 1 week course. A lot of college students don’t get  enough of this critical thinking and these deep analytical skills taught to them at most colleges in America today, which is sad.

He tells me that you dream of making your one week summer course into a full time school one day, I hope that your dream happens because America needs more of this.

George S. Clason, successful businessman and author of The Richest Man in Babylon, once said “Our prosperity as a nation depends upon the personal financial prosperity of each of us as individuals…our acts can be no wiser than our thoughts. Our thinking can be no wiser than our understanding.” Benjamin Franklin also once said that with all our getting, get understanding.

I find that you’re at the forefront of helping our kids understand not just themselves better, but the world, and the inner working of humanity as a whole. This can and will translate itself deeper down the line into a stronger, more prosperous society.

Thank you for all that you do, Marsha!

Sincerely,
Nawaphon

During the seminar, Derick was a natural leader whose affable, inquisitive nature brought TGC students together and helped tremendously to create an open and inviting environment. Throughout the week, it was evident that many of the ideas were new and challenging to him, and he worked hard to improve himself. What was admirable in Derick was that he always aimed to understand things for himself and connect the ideas with other texts and activities throughout the week, especially drawing from his own life experience. His attitude of openness and his enthusiasm to learn and challenge himself encouraged others to push themselves outside of comfort their zones as well.

Not only are other’s noticing Derick’s growth in intellectual prowess, he himself knows how he has grown. The effective methodology of The Great Connections Seminar creates an environment where students can discover within themselves their own powers and abilities. This self-empowerment allows students like Derick to walk away with the confidence that they can be an active leader in their own learning and life.

Derick Ansah on his experience at The Great Connections Seminar

If you know a young person or student aged 16 and up who could benefit from a transformative experience like Derick’s, take a look at what this summer’s Great Connections Seminar has to offer. Scholarships and early registration rates are available now!

 

LECTURE: Feb. 28, What Education Could Be Like in a Free Society

We’re pleased to announce that on Sunday, February 28, 2016, RIFI Founder and President Marsha Familaro Enright will be guest lecturing at The Maryland Objectivist Society on “The Collectivist Control of Education and What Education Could Be Like in a Free Society.”

Her talk coincides with the International Students for Liberty Conference (ISFLC) in Washington, D.C., where RIFI will be exhibiting to promote The Great Connections Seminar in Chicago. If you’re in the area, be sure to check out both events!

Maryland Objectivist Society Lecture: Marsha Familaro Enright

In her talk, Ms. Enright will discuss how public education costs most of us a pretty penny in taxes, yet yields poor outcomes:

  • making many of us pay twice – first in taxes and then in private school tuition;
  • depriving of choice the children of the less well-off, who can’t escape to private schools;
  • failing to provide crucial knowledge, reasoning power, motivation, and work skills.

As technology drives the job market, requiring higher and higher skills, the situation is only getting worse – more and more individuals are being left behind, unable to adequately and honorably support themselves.

In her talk Ms. Enright will address:

  • What’s driving the decline in the quality of education – the historical, economic, psychological and political reasons;
  • The bright spots of hope and the real reasons for optimism in our current educational situation;
  • The surprising picture of what education could be like in a freer society, with some ideas as to how to get there; and
  • What individuals can do to hasten this better future for them and their children.

Come to hear and meet Marsha as well as other concerned parents, taxpayers and civic minded individuals about what can be done to create a better future in education.

About Marsha:

Marsha Familaro Enright is an author and speaker on, among other topics, human development, psychology, and creativity. Many of her interviews are available to watch online.

She is the creator of The Great Connections Summer Seminar, a week-long, liberal arts course for students 16 and up, focuses on classic texts across the ideological spectrum, including those of the philosophy, economics, politics, and history of freedom. Its evidence-based discussion principles significantly increase student reasoning power, as well as collaborative work skills. The program has a transformative effect on most students who attend, radically increasing their autonomy. Learn more at www.thegreatconnections.org.

Check out the event and RSVP on the MDOS (Maryland Objectivist Society) Facebook page here. For further information, visit the Eventbrite page here.

WHEN: Sunday, February 28, 2016 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

WHERE: PGAMA, Executive Boardroom – 9685 Gerwig Lane Columbia, MD 21046

A Summer Program for Students 16 and older

Get an edge on college – and life! Come to

The Great Connections Seminar

A Summer Program for Students 16 and older

Saturday, July 22-Saturday, July 29, 2017

Chicago

If you’re not a student…

Could your favorite student benefit from this program? Please forward this information.

Free yourself: Students success

Unleash your mind.

Strengthen your autonomy.

Expand your knowledge.

Experience your power to affect others.

“The seminar gave me confidence that I could achieve great things. It was like something was lit inside. I acquired the intellectual tools to help me come to my own conclusions. And I realized how lacking my formal education was. It was one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.” Brendan Moore, Coe College

Registration is now open for
The Great Connections Seminar

Our theme this year is “Reason and Evolution”

To students…

  • Are you tired of classes where you’re told what to think?
  • Are you looking for more than memorizing information and reciting it on tests?
  • Do you want to be challenged to think for yourself?
  • Can you confidently argue for – and act on – your point of view?
  • Do you want to be prepared for today’s ever-changing markets?
  • Do you want to connect with passionate and principled students from the U.S. and abroad to discuss life’s most challenging questions…while enjoying music, dancing, architecture, and art to the fullest?

Students practicing improv techniques. If your answer is “yes,” then join us this  coming July for a unique “total immersion”  learning experience in one exciting and  challenging week of intensive classes,  interactive sessions, off-campus expeditions,  and rewarding camaraderie. It just might  change your life, as it has for previous  students.

(Students practice improvisation techniques above.]

No matter where you go to school, this unusual experience will serve you well. The knowledge and skills acquired here could prove to be your most valuable asset in college, graduate school – and life. For details, please read on…

Janessa Colomer

“I love this program! I learned how to approach [philosophical] topics, learn mathematics and found people who are motivated, determined, and proactive to further their education.” Janessa Colomer, University of California San Diego

Chicago by the river

 Preview what you’ll experience…

 

 

 

Through this program, you will:

  • Discover why philosophy is crucial to your survival and flourishing, and find the important meaning and implications for yourself in seemingly simple issues.
  • Increase your ability to ask questions that will change what you get from – and how you perform in – your classes, your job, your life.
  • Become a versatile thinker with our evidence-based discussion method applied to an extraordinary range of subjects, from philosophy to mathematics, poetry to politics.
  • Discuss the links between between theory and practice, choice and action.
  • Learn how to creatively collaborate with enthusiastic peersIvy Hood

“I learned ‘Question your teachers–if you simply soak up what they tell you, you don’t have a true understanding.” Ivy Hood, B.A. International Studies, B.S. Economics, Rockford University, 2016 Student Laureate, The Lincoln Academy of Illinois

Learn How to Write Well

Do you know how to write well and express your thoughts effectively?

Writing with skill is crucial to achieving many goals: course-work, cover letters for jobs, emails inquiring about post-doc positions, persuading others to invest in your business idea – you name it.

This year at The Great Connections, you’ll benefit from the instruction of a professional writing expert, Malachy Walsh. See all about him below.

Connect timeless principles to today’s hottest issues…

At the seminar next summer, we’ll show you how to understand and enjoy challenging works that have changed the world.

Discussions of Pythagoras, Charles Darwin, Joseph Schumpeter, and other great thinkers, will help you discover the often-hidden connections between classic principles and contemporary controversies.

Sable Levy talking with other students. “It’s four months later and  I  haven’t stopped thinking about the  seminar. At  the risk of sounding trite or  hyperbolic, I  know it has changed my life    forever.” Sable  Levy, Drew University (second  from right)

On architecture tour of Chicago.

For example:

  • Examine the nature of life and its relation to the mind in Aristotle’s DeAnima–and relate it to Darwin’s discoveries,
  • Explore a poem that was a right-turn in human intellectual evolution–and revived the Western world, Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things.
  • See how Montesquieu’s Spirit of the Laws influenced social evolution.

We’ll delve into works from science to economics and literature – all about evolution.

Derick Ansah

“When I met him again at the beginning of this fall    semester, it was like meeting a completely new    person. Derick had changed mentally and spiritually    so much. It’s as if he grew 2 years’ worth of  college prowess in your short one-week  course.” – Nawaphon Sittisawasakul, SUNY-  Purchase (Derick Ansah pictured at left)

See how to use The Great Connections in your life in our latest videos here.

Benefit from individual attention…

In our discussion groups (maximum of 15 students) instructors won’t force-feed you prefabricated notions. Rather, our talented faculty will teach you one of Great Connections 2013 students studying together at breakfast.the  most important lessons of all: how to grasp the  meaning of events and ideas for yourself. Why? One  of our priorities is constant interaction between  instructors and students.  Participants will work  individually  and “hands-on” with superb teachers  and mentors who will coach them one-on-one in achieving their goals.Guest speakers won’t simply deliver a lecture and depart but will be available for face-to-face discussions both in and out of class.Eric Rhodes, The Great Connections 2009“Eric spent several hours telling us about his experience in Chicago and how much it meant to him. His father and I are delighted!” Lucy Hair, mother of Eric Rhodes, University of California Riverside 

Free Yourself…

All this adds up to a culture in our seminar like no other; one which encourages and respects your individuality, ideas, and independence, and which will energize you while you free yourself to take charge of your own education and your life.

Ian Mihura and Sable Levy “We made our own society, where my ideas, my  presence and effectiveness counted. Now I know I can  make a difference.” Ian Mihura, senior, Clarin High School,  Buenos Aires (at left)

 For one transformative week, experience a superior  way of learning … and discover the culture of a rational  and free society.

Meet your instructors…

Marsha Familaro Enright Marsha Familaro Enright, Seminar Leader
 B.A. Biology, M.A., Psychology, President, The Reason,  Individualism, Freedom Institute, the Foundation for the  College of the United States

Ms. Enright brings a remarkable range of knowledge and analytical ability in both the sciences and the humanities to her role as the seminar’s lead instructor. She will guide students in class discussions throughout the week, as well as lead informative tours. Ms. Enright has extensive teaching experience with adults and adolescents in schools, conferences, and summer camps. She also writes on topics ranging from economics to esthetics, neuropsychology to politics.

In 1990, Ms. Enright founded Council Oak Montessori School for children ages 3-15. Chicago Magazine named it one of the top private schools in the city in 2006 and 2011.

Liz Parker

Liz Parker, B.S. Economics and B.A. Global Affairs,
 George Mason University
 The Great Connections Teacher Training Course

Ms. Parker has participated in more than ten Great Connections  Seminars, and co-instructed for the past three years. She brings a wide range of talents to the program from her background in art and television production, as well as economics and international relations.

Andrew Humphries, Co-Instructor, The Great Connections Andrew Humphries, Co-Instructor
 B.A. Liberal Arts, M.Ed. Montessori Integrative Learning,  Graduate student, Economics, George Mason University,  Master leader of Socratic Seminars.

A graduate of the rigorous Great Books classics program at St. John’s College, Sante Fe, Mr. Humphries is a Koch Fellow, Grover Herman Fellow, and Young Communicators Fellow of the Institute for Humane Studies. He also worked at the Institute of Economic Affairs, the high school program at The School of the Woods Montessori School, Houston, the Centre for Civil Society, New Delhi, and Michael Polanyi College at Universidad Francisco Marroquin, Guatemala City.

 MalachMalachy Walshy Walsh, Leader, The Writing Connection

 B.A. Georgetown University, M.A.  Depaul University, and  perennial  Ph.D. candidate in literature,  University of  Chicago.

In his 5-day course, The Writing Connection. Mr. Walsh will teach you how to write for any purpose, based on his 25 years of experience as a Creative Director at J. Walter Thompson Worldwide, and Aristotle’s Rhetoric. His passion is helping people learn how to write better, because knowing how to write well creates a lifetime of opportunities.  As a manager at Kraft put it, “Malachy shows you how to pick your own brain.” He will also be available as a professional mentor to the students. See more about him below.

Enjoy special presentations and meet exciting professionals…

Meet accomplished professionals in a variety of careers of potential interest to you. You’ll learn first-hand how they do their jobs and get personal answers to your questions. You will meet people such as Ruth Baker, J.D., Baker and Enright, Chicago and Ralph Yuan, Quantitative Researcher at a Wall Street investment firm.

Think hard, work hard, play hard…

Students Jake Ilson and Eric Rhodes swimming in Lake Michigan

Our program includes informative seminars and mind-  expanding presentations, plus adventurous off-campus  expeditions that connect classroom theory to the real world.  We will draw upon Chicago’s rich intellectual, architectuChicago lakefrontral,  cultural, and commercial  resources, capitalize upon classic films,  music, and works of art.

We’ll journey to famous museums, research facilities, business clubs, restaurants, retail stores and beyond, such as:

  • Gorgeous Grant Park
  • Lake Michigan’s Oak Street Beach,
  • The Oriental Museum on the University of Chicago campus,
  • The Second City Comedy Club, birthplace of improv and midwife to Saturday Night Live

Experience the excitement of one of the most beautiful and vibrant cities in North America, Chicago. You’ll attend classes in conference rooms and live in its fully equipped apartments of Marie Robinson Hall, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. You’ll be just steps from their great recreational complex, and a short bus ride to Millennium Park, the Art Institute, the Chicago Board of Trade, and the beautiful beaches of Lake Michigan.

Due to the individual attention each student will receive, enrollment is limited to  15 per seminar discussion group. DMarina Coll and Carolina Ciblis, Great Connections 2011on’t risk being left out –  enroll today! See complete seminar details below.

 

“It was good when people said ‘I don’t understand.’” Marina Coll, English and philosophy teacher, Our Lady of the Shelter School, Buenos Aires, Argentina (on the left in the picture)

Seminar Details
The basics: The Great Connections Seminar will begin at 3:00 PM on Saturday, July 22nd and end at midnight on Saturday July 29th. You will check out of your dorm on Sunday morning, July 30th and have the rest of the day to enjoy the city.

Location:
Marie Robinson Hall at The University of Illinois at Chicago811 W. Maxwell, Chicago, IL

Capsule schedule:
 Participants will attend seminars in the mornings, go on excursions in the afternoons, and engage in extended discussions in the evenings. Saturday afternoon/evening: An orientation and initial Socratic Seminar. Sunday to Saturday: Socratic Seminars, special presentations, excursions, meetings with professionals, extended breaks to eat and explore on your own; Saturday evening: A closing dinner and party; Sunday morning: The day is free to explore the city or return home, at your option.

Readings:
In the spring/summer, we will email links for most of the texts so that you can read them in preparation for the seminar. On the opening Saturday afternoon, you will receive a specially printed book with all the readings to use during the seminar. We highly recommend you read all selections before you arrive.

Accommodations and Meals:
 You will reside in the contemporary, air-conditioned apartments of our conference building, Marie Robinson Hall. You will have one bedroom in a 4-bedroom apartment with a fully equipped kitchen. We will provide the opening and closing dinners. A Whole Foods and a Jewel Supermarket are 5 minutes walking from the Hall and there are many food stores, eateries and cafes nearby offering everything from hamburgers and hot dogs to Thai food and sushi for your other meals. There’s also have a cafeteria within walking distance. Students often eat together and are encouraged to make meals together in their apartments. You can sign up to use the University of Illinois at Chicago recreational facility.Transportation: Downtown Chicago is reached easily from O’Hare and Midway airports via CTA train or airport shuttle, as well as by bus and car. Links to maps, information about what to bring, and details about Chicago will be sent to you after you register.Fees: Full tuition to the program is $1,200, which includes the opening and closing dinners, and books. Room in an equipped apartment, with use of conference and entertainment facilities, is an additional $800.Fee Schedule:Before March 1st, tuition is $300, Room and Board $300Before May 1st, tuition is $500; Room and Board $500,After May 1st, tuition is $1,200 and Room and Board $800.Some scholarships are available covering tuition, room and some board (see details on the Application Form here and contact Marsha Familaro Enright at menright@rifinst.org or 773-677-6418 with any questions).

How to register for the seminar:

1. To apply online click here to go to the Application Form. After your interview and acceptance, you will be directed to a totally secure web page, where you may use your credit card to pay for the program. For your information, the payment page is here.

2. To apply by postal mail, fax, or email, click here to print out an application form. Complete and mail to 9400 S. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL 60643.  After your interview and acceptance, you can mail your check to the same address, call us at 773-677-6418 to pay by phone, or pay online at our website.

Jan. 24 EVENT: The Collectivist Control of Education and What Education Would be Like in a Free Society

RIFI Founder and President Marsha Familaro Enright will be speaking on the collectivists’ control of education in the U.S. on Sunday, January 24th in the Atlanta area. We would enjoy having you join us that afternoon! Please let us know if you have any questions. You can contact Marsha at: menright@rifinst.org or call at 773-677-6418.

Wavy hair lace wigs

“The Collectivist Control of Education and
What Education Would be Like in a Free Society”
Sunday January 24, 2016
4:00-5:30 P.M.
Smyrna, GA

A talk by Marsha Familaro Enright, educational entrepreneur, author of the last chapter, “Liberating Education” in Common Ground on Common Core, editor of Ayn Rand Explained, Lead Developer and Instructor, The Great Connections Seminar for High School and College Students, and Founder and President of Council Oak Montessori School in Chicago for over 26 years.

Many of us are aware of the continuing control of Academia by the collectivists, and how they are using education to transform our young people into sheepish conformists to their agenda. Ms. Enright will discuss the insidious ways in which they achieve these aims, analyzing the psychology of it. As a tonic to that gloomy situation, she will project the surprising picture of what education could be like in a fully free society, with some ideas as to how to get there

Public education costs most of us a pretty penny in taxes, yet yields poor outcomes:

  • For our own children, driving many of us to pay two times; in taxes and private school tuition;
  • Especially for children of the less well-off, who can’t escape to private schools;
  • For too many, in the lack of crucial knowledge, reasoning power, motivation, and work skills.

As technology drives the job market, requiring higher and higher skills, a very good example is the hair lace front wigs. the situation is only getting worse – more and more individuals are being left behind, unable to adequately and honorably support themselves.

Hear about:

  • What’s driving this decline – the historical, economic, psychological and political reasons;
  • The bright spots of hope and the real reasons for optimism in our current educational situation;
  • The surprising picture of what education could be like in a freer society, with some ideas as to how to get there;
  • What you can do to hasten this better future for you and your children.

Come to hear and meet Marsha as well as other concerned parents, taxpayers and civic minded individuals about what can be done to create a better future in education.

About Marsha:

Marsha Familaro Enright is an author and speaker on, among other topics, human development, psychology, and creativity. Many of her interviews are available to watch online.

She is the creator of The Great Connections Summer Seminar, a week-long, liberal arts course for students 16 and up, focuses on classic texts across the ideological spectrum, including those of the philosophy, economics, politics, and history of freedom. Its evidence-based discussion principles significantly increase student reasoning power, as well as collaborative work skills. The program has a transformative effect on most students who attend, radically increasing their autonomy. Learn more at www.thegreatconnections.org.

Check out the event and RSVP on the ATLOS (Atlanta Objectivist Society) Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/924843764230575/.

For further information, contact: Kelly Elmore kellyelmore79@gmail.com.

The Long Game of the New Left

“After the Vietnam War, a lot of us didn’t just crawl back into our literary cubicles; we stepped into academic positions. With the war over, our visibility was lost, and it seemed for a while–to the unobservant–that we had disappeared. Now we have tenure, and the work of reshaping the universities has begun in earnest.”

So wrote one professor in The Chronicle of Higher Education, quoted by Roger Kimball in The Wall Street Journal last Saturday from his book Tenured Radicals: How Politics Have Corrupted Our Education.

If you’re wondering how we got to a place where college students throw a tantrum over Halloween costumes at Yale–or why the move towards “safe spaces” on campus is all but eliminating free speech–the decades-long take-over of Academia by the New Left is the reason.

But the corruption is much deeper than mere politics: it results from an entire philosophy of thought and life most sharply encapsulated in New Left philosopher Herbert Marcuse’s work.

The professor quoted gives us just one piece of evidence about the New Left’s long game to change the culture. There are plenty of others, such as radical terrorist Weatherman Bill Ayers‘ ascension to Distinguished Professor of Education, overseeing teacher credentialing at the National Education Association.

And Howard Zinn‘s shaping of student minds through his People’s History of the United States (“People’s” anything is New Left code for a collectivist-leftist slant). This book has sold over 2 million copies in 20+ years of use at high schools and colleges–and is the source of the “1 percent/99 percent” grievance ideology.

You see, philosophy has long-term consequences, especially if actively promoted. The New Left’s ideas and agenda were taught to the young in the ’50’s and 60’s in the philosophy of Herbert Marcuse. The students who absorbed and adopted his ideas tried to change the culture towards a radically collectivist/socialist agenda with their violent protests in the ’60’s and ’70’s. But it didn’t take in the U.S., with its deeply embedded individualist culture.

So they changed their strategy, and took over Academia. They knew that, in the long game, shaping the minds of the young from grade school to graduate school was the way to change the culture.

Their molding of young minds into fearful, ignorant, emotion-driven nightmares who can’t reason–who consider reason and objectivity something to be reviled as expressions of the “privileged” classes–is experiencing many victories today. The suppression of free speech, the physical intimidation of those who disagree, and the sacking of administrators and teachers who stand up to them are but a few of the consequences.

They’re similar tactics to the Brown Shirts in 1930’s Europe, and equally chilling.

And yet more evidence for why those who want reason, individualism, and freedom to flourish need to support independent education institutions such as The Great Connections Seminar and our efforts to create a new and independent college. Then, students will be given a real educational alternative, where they can learn the full range of ideas, how to reason well, and make up their own minds.

Events

THE GREAT CONNECTIONS SEMINAR for students 16 and older

Registration for the Great Connections Summer Seminar is open.

The week-long program includes Great Connections-style discussions of classic texts in philosophy, logic and reasoning, science and mathematics, economics, history, psychology, literature and other humanities. Students also study logic, introspection, artwork, architecture, meet accomplished professionals in a variety of fields from finance to physics, medicine to ballet. Also, we visit places such as factories, scientific laboratories, entrepreneurial warehouses/offices, Montessori schools, The Second City Comedy Club, and The Art Institute of Chicago.

To view a description of the program for 2017, click here.

Fees for the seminar cover tuition, entrance fees, room, and some board; in 2017, they are $2,000 for the week. However, there are discounts for early enrollment, and some scholarships available. All scholarship recipients are asked to contribute what they honestly can afford towards the program.

Below is the schedule from last year; for the complete schedule for 2017 go to this link.

Questions?